The disabled among us

I have a very good friend, Larry, who is highly accomplished.  He is a chartered accountant, has an MBA and at one point was planning on doing a PHD.  Education wise and financially, Larry is more than accomplished. Religion wise, he is accomplished as he lives his faith daily.

However, my friend is disabled in both legs.  He uses crutches or wheelchair depending on the situation. He had been vaccinated against polio, yet was still afflicted.  I started this paragraph with the word ‘however’ because at times all that he is and has achieved in his life is negated by the fact that he is disabled.

For instance, one day Larry was taking a walk around his neighborhood on his wheelchair as he regularly did when he met a group of drunk boys who immediately wanted to beat him.  The reason?  “How can a disabled person be moving around?  You are supposed to be at home like all other disabled people!”  The least drunk boy grabbed the wheelchair and ran off with Larry to protect him.  The merciful boy said that Larry had already been ‘punished’ by God so beating him would not be fair.  I know the boy was wrong and ignorant in saying that Larry had been ‘punished’, but I think he just did not know any better.  Important is the fact that he saved Larry.

It breaks my heart when I see disabled people being mistreated just because they are different.  Some people tend to overlook the fact that life deals different people with different situations.  Why can we not accept others as they are?  They did not choose to be different.

Larry is a strong guy and looks more on his positive experiences than the negative ones.  He, and others like him, just want to be treated like everyone else.

 

 

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12 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Minuscule Moments
    Apr 09, 2015 @ 06:44:55

    Like everyone else, that is the dream but when you are different its a struggle. I tell my son to be himself and that being different is a beautiful thing. Who wants to be the same as everyone? My children have been taught to appreciate differences. I hope they continue to do so all their lives. Your friend is an inspiration and it is a shame the young do not see it.

    Reply

    • Zambian Lady
      Apr 09, 2015 @ 18:06:19

      Teaching children at a young to embrace people who are different from them is important, as you have said. I hope your children will pass on that knowledge to future generations.

      Reply

      • Minuscule Moments
        Apr 09, 2015 @ 22:02:26

        Me too, my parents taught me to appreciate all cultures and diversity in this life and to always care for the ones that are different and in need of a little support.

  2. Grannymar
    Apr 06, 2015 @ 17:00:31

    The real disabled are those who abuse the physically or mentally challenged, who try to live normally despite these challenges.

    Reply

  3. Gallivanta
    Apr 06, 2015 @ 10:18:02

    Glad that Larry remains positive. We all need respect and kindness, and sometimes the troublemakers have had little experience of those qualities themselves. Thank goodness one of the boys found some commonsense and compassion within himself.

    Reply

  4. mukhamani
    Apr 06, 2015 @ 05:39:54

    Very true. My son has this eye problem, RP from birth. He is now doing his PHD in English literature. Fortunately for him he never faced any problem as such due to his disability but he tells me the problems faced by many of his friends who are disabled in other ways. The so called normal people find it very difficult to accept anything other than their idea of normal. It is really sad. Thanks for sharing. Regards.

    Reply

    • Zambian Lady
      Apr 06, 2015 @ 14:07:20

      I had to Google RP since I did not know what it meant. I am sorry to hear about his condition, but it’s nice that he has not let it hold him back. I wish him all the best. Thanks for your comment.

      Reply

  5. anotherday2paradise
    Apr 06, 2015 @ 00:47:07

    Good for Larry that he can rise above such treatment and insults. It’s really sad how people can be so ignorant.

    Reply

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